Responding to EMS Today!

http://emstoday.com/

The JEMS Conference and Exposition starts today. I will not be attending, but copies of my book, Responding will be. You can find the book at booth 4134, The National EMS Museum. http://www.emsmuseum.org/

The publisher, Emergency Publishing will be donating a portion of the proceeds to The National EMS Museum Foundation. If you are attending the conference, I hope you buy a copy of the book, and help support a great cause.

Peter Canning did a review of the book on his site, http://medicscribe.com/2012/02/responding/ and I am absolutely floored by his words. His writing is a big reason I took the chance to write Rescuing Providence, and then this blog. That he considers my writing so highly is an honor I will not take lightly.

Responding

Peter Canning

I’m sitting in my ambulance posted in the North end of Hartford. Thankfully it has been a quiet morning so far and that has enabled me to finish Responding, Michael Morse’s great sequel to his first book Rescuing Providence. Michael is an excellent writer and one of the best EMS bloggers around.

Responding chronicles a 38 hour shift, but it also has flashbacks to earlier calls, and at the end has many of the short stand alone stories that for me are the reason for reading Morse’s blog.

What I like about this book, as well, as his first one, is that I found at several points, I was reminded of what I like most about EMS – the view of others’ lives and the quiet moments where you just stop and feel the whole universe around you, and sad or joyful, tragic or miraculous in that moment you feel that you are a witness to life and the human condition that is laid bare before you, and even if that moment hurts, you feel honored to be allowed to see and feel it and to be present. Three moments in particular in this book stand out for me, Morse on scene over time with a Cambodian woman, whose history he has learned, the brutal childhood and the spiral into alcohol, ending with him present to call the time on her now cold and stiff body; a scene where Morse visits his own mother in a nursing home and brushes her hair while she sleeps; and then on a transport to pick up a child with severe disabilities, and witness the love of his caregivers, as they brush the boy’s hair who they have cared for his whole life and say good bye. We as EMS are there in moments where we see life in its barest truth, and we also have the gift of touch that the single most powerful gesture we possess to affirm that we, as an individual and as a collective, are human.

And by recording these moments, Morse brings our world to life and does the job of the writer that of bearing witness to our humanity.

I think this is what William Faulkner was getting at in hisNobel Prize address, where he described the job of a writer. Man, he wrote, “is immortal, not because he alone among creatures has an inexhaustible voice, but because he has a soul, a spirit capable of compassion and sacrifice and endurance. The poet’s, the writer’s, duty is to write about these things. It is his privilege to help man endure by lifting his heart, by reminding him of the courage and honor and hope and pride and compassion and pity and sacrifice which have been the glory of his past. The poet’s voice need not merely be the record of man, it can be one of the props, the pillars to help him endure and prevail.”

Before I became an EMT I read EMS books for accounts of the calls. Now the calls themselves are less interesting to me that the writer’s ability to chronicle what our lives in EMS are really like. While this book has war stories, more important for me is the view of what Morse’s life and world is like as an emergency responder and how he has come to his place in it.

Responding is welcome addition to our growing body of EMS literature.

 

Thank you Peter!

 

1 Comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

background image Blogger Img

Michael Morse

Recent Posts
fire Survival August 27, 2014
The middle door August 22, 2014
adraniline Adrenaline Junky August 19, 2014
Comments
Nathan Stanaway
Adrenaline Junky
I think there is room for all of us in the future of EMS. Just like not all nurses like the ER, not all paramedics only want to run the sickest patients. Personally, my favorite calls are MCIs, a close second is probably the little old lady low fall. We can specialize. If you don't…
2014-08-25 02:48:52
Michael Morse
Adrenaline Junky
Thank you Renee! I was starting to think I was the only one. Stay safe out there.
2014-08-21 17:02:24
Renee
Adrenaline Junky
Ya know, I identify with everything you just said! But then I am a special kind of twisted, because I recently got back into EMS after having been out of it for 20 years... I'm not a nurse, I'm a MEDIC and damn proud of it! We in EMS are a special breed and not…
2014-08-21 16:43:47
John Corrigan
EMS Staffed by Nurses
Let us not forget who started this whole EMS / medic thing; Clara Barton, RN "Angel of the Battlefield" who founded the American Red Cross. My point is, this has always been a collaboration through the years. Only due to nursing shortages and the frequency of injury on our "highways and bi-ways" there was a…
2014-08-21 14:21:56
Ben Ploner
EMS Staffed by Nurses
Maybe i'm missing something, but what does a transfer truck have to do with community paramedicine? Regardless, i'm in Canada and there have been a number of successful projects here using blended RN/Paramedic staffing to fill physician shortages in rural communities, as well as both using both NP's and Paramedics to deliver hospital grade care…
2014-08-20 16:13:54

Uniform Stories

Visit Uniform Stories

Responding $3.99

wordpress visitor counter
February 2012
M T W T F S S
« Jan   Mar »
 12345
6789101112
13141516171819
20212223242526
272829  

FireEMS Blogs eNewsletter

Sign-up to receive our free monthly eNewsletter

LATEST EMS NEWS

HOT FORUM DISCUSSIONS