Still Working

You could have twenty minutes or twenty years on the job, it makes no difference. When a call comes your way; a true emergency, time stands still and nothing else matters except for what is happening at that very moment. The fear of multitasking, the worries about past mistakes and future plans end and it’s just you, your crew and the patient.

There isn’t a more perfect moment than the one you are in; each second passes, leading you into the next, and then the next, and with each second comes a chance that your patient will have a future, and not just a past. The IV’s go in, the medications get pushed, compressions and ventilation’s done, defibrilation, the bouncy ride in the back of the rig, everybody focused on the same goal and doing their best.

It’s a magical environment, with the magic going mostly unnoticed by us, because we are too busy to acknowledge it.

Sometimes, the magic even works.

Ten minutes or an hour or more passes, but it feels like just an instant. There isn’t a better feeling than what you experience during that moment in time, when somebodies life is on the line, when all of your training and experience comes together, all of your worries are gone, your hopes are put aside and you simply perform. It brings us to our most primitive state, where survival is our only concern.

Our basic instincts take over, and we turn from a complex individual with hopes and dreams and problems and distractions into little more than the culmination of all we have learned, and we are able to channel that energy, and hyper-focus on the job that lies in front of us.

These are the moments at work that I live for, when I feel most alive, When the monotony is pushed aside, the boredom and fatigue forgotten, and the opportunity to save a life is upon me.

Even when the magic doesn’t work.

Because sometimes it just doesn’t.

But when it does…

 

How about you? Does the magic still work?

2 Comments

  • J.M. says:

    What an eloquent way to hit the nail squarely on the head! Having to experienced both sides of the coin, where my life was in danger and times where the patient’s life was in danger, your words speak to the truth of the situation. Again, well said!

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Michael Morse

JEMS Talk: Google Hangout

Comments
Mike F
Top 10 reasons EMS gets no respect
Or maybe you could simply point out that it should be "than" instead of "then" instead of continuing the trend of sarcastic "bashing".
2015-05-15 06:06:55
Nile Barnes
Top 10 reasons EMS gets no respect
Of course the mispelled (homophone) in the image for number 5, doesn't help folks respect the level of education.
2015-05-14 18:21:53
Tim
Should firefighters shop while on duty?
Absolutely - good point. Of course if you live a bit further north where snow , Ice and bitterly cold weather is around for 7 months it is a bit to chilly to be hanging outside the rig hoping for people to come talk to you. We park our rigs away from the direct line…
2015-05-14 17:20:27
Commissioner Carey: Go pound sand | Burned-Out Medic
Mealtime
[…] this: Emergency service providers AND THEIR EQUIPMENT stay together AT ALL TIMES so they can respond immediately to a call for service without stopping anywhere such as the station to pick up other crew members or […]
2015-05-07 00:21:13
Unlimited-Unscheduled Hours
Twenty, again…and again!
Michael, Congratulations again on that fine piece, your retirement, and the better place you are in now. I read that piece when you first put it on the blog and it stuck in my head. I didn't realize it myself, but I was entering a dark place too that went on for a few more…
2015-04-27 23:54:12

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