Still Working

You could have twenty minutes or twenty years on the job, it makes no difference. When a call comes your way; a true emergency, time stands still and nothing else matters except for what is happening at that very moment. The fear of multitasking, the worries about past mistakes and future plans end and it’s just you, your crew and the patient.

There isn’t a more perfect moment than the one you are in; each second passes, leading you into the next, and then the next, and with each second comes a chance that your patient will have a future, and not just a past. The IV’s go in, the medications get pushed, compressions and ventilation’s done, defibrilation, the bouncy ride in the back of the rig, everybody focused on the same goal and doing their best.

It’s a magical environment, with the magic going mostly unnoticed by us, because we are too busy to acknowledge it.

Sometimes, the magic even works.

Ten minutes or an hour or more passes, but it feels like just an instant. There isn’t a better feeling than what you experience during that moment in time, when somebodies life is on the line, when all of your training and experience comes together, all of your worries are gone, your hopes are put aside and you simply perform. It brings us to our most primitive state, where survival is our only concern.

Our basic instincts take over, and we turn from a complex individual with hopes and dreams and problems and distractions into little more than the culmination of all we have learned, and we are able to channel that energy, and hyper-focus on the job that lies in front of us.

These are the moments at work that I live for, when I feel most alive, When the monotony is pushed aside, the boredom and fatigue forgotten, and the opportunity to save a life is upon me.

Even when the magic doesn’t work.

Because sometimes it just doesn’t.

But when it does…

 

How about you? Does the magic still work?

2 Comments

  • J.M. says:

    What an eloquent way to hit the nail squarely on the head! Having to experienced both sides of the coin, where my life was in danger and times where the patient’s life was in danger, your words speak to the truth of the situation. Again, well said!

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Michael Morse

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Comments
Michael Morse
Narcan or Recovery
Thank you for your comment Carolyln, you are welcome here anytime. Your husband took hostages when he married you, I'm sorry he never got the help he needed. I live very closely with an addict and alcoholic, and hope other people with addictions get the help they need before what happenned to your family happens…
2015-03-02 18:03:48
Carolyln
Narcan or Recovery
I probably shouldn't even reply as I'm not a drug addict nor an alcoholic, but I know what it is to be married to an alcoholic for 44 years and watch him slowly kill himself. To hear him tell me I'd better not ever do an intervention on him or he'd throw me out of…
2015-03-02 04:27:03
Katie Lee
Narcan or Recovery
I am a paramedic student writing a paper on ethics involved in Narcan use. Thank you for sharing your thoughts and experiences.
2015-02-28 16:40:45
Michael Morse
Narcan or Recovery
Thank you George.
2015-02-24 21:29:45
Michael Morse
Narcan or Recovery
Thanks for that Gilbert, wish I had said it that way, would have saved me a lot of time deleting attack comments that people seem to think is their right to post if their opinion is different from my own.
2015-02-24 21:27:55

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